Cellular Memory


“I love words. I love to sing them and speak them and even now, I must admit, I have fallen into the joy of writing them.” – Anne Rice

Below was originally posted in the Finding Inner Strength Together (FIST) blog:

I normally arrive at our monthly meetings for the Finding Inner Strength Together (FIST) group about 40 minutes or so before things begin.  This time is normally spent with Cindi to discuss the topic of the day.  This is the time when Cindi gives me a brief of sorts of any new members to the group.  Last night Cindi and I talked about the past couple of days where Bonnie and I waited on another pathology report.  During this post 5:PM whistle discussion with Cindi, a term, another medical term for when a woman learns of a lump after spending a year in the quote unquote survivor status of a breast cancer patient.  It’s called “Cellular Memory”.  As in most things related to learning breast cancer research topics, or the standings in the American League East – I refer to Google.  After all, everything on the internet is 100% factual, right?  So while trying to provide each of you with information related to the healthcare of yourself, your partner, your friend, etc, let me provide you with the best definition of “Cellular Memory” I found this morning:

How is cellular memory formed?

“You may wonder, we go through so many emotions and experiences in a day, does it all get stored in the cells? The answer that healers have found, is that if an episode which is very emotionally intense is suppressed it gets stored, or else if there is some thought or belief which is very repetitive it finds itself ingrained inside the cells. The cells follow inputs not from our conscious mind, but from the subconscious mind, which is almost 90 per cent of our mind. Almost 90 per cent of our bodily functions are dictated by this part of the mind, which receives constant inputs and keeps storing within itself, what it considers relevant. Diseases, it appears, are caused when we suppress a powerful negative emotion and try to tell ourselves that all is well. Although the conscious mind is convinced and may even forget about the experience, the subconscious mind remembers it and magnifies it. Certain chemicals that are produced in our body in response to that negative experience are blocked within because we do not want to deal with it. If these affected cells remain blocked over a long period of time, it prevents healthy cells from interacting with them. There is an increased likelihood that if disease occurs, it will occur in the part of the body where the cell receptors are blocked. So is the case with repetitive thoughts. Negative thoughts and beliefs once programmed into the subconscious keep auto-playing throughout our lives without our realizing it. Little wonder so many of us keep attracting similar people, relationships, health issues and experience patterns in our life repeatedly.”[1]

The questions related to this topic are too many for this simple blog.  I do ask myself this one question which is a dovetail off the last sentence … is this how our monthly Men’s Cancer Support Group was formed?

Certainly invokes something to think about until we meet again.  Next meeting scheduled for Thursday, July 5th.  Hope the new faces this month learned something about themselves last night, I certainly did.

 Thank you Cindi.

2 thoughts on “Cellular Memory

  1. Hey there, You have done a fantastic job. I’ll certainly digg it and personally recommend to my friends. I am confident they will be benefited from this website.

  2. Pingback: breast cancer research paper outline

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